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1. SIXTEENTH GLASGOW LUNCHTIME RENDEZVOUS

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10:00 – 15:00 22 Jan 2019
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4. Melville Room, Gilbert Scott Building (Main Building), University of Glasgow, University Avenue, Glasgow, UK, G12 8QQ

Programme:

1000    Arrival and coffee/tea in the Melville Room

1015    Welcome and Introduction by Dr Robert Railton, Glasgow Meeting Organiser

1020    Lecture Quantum Technology - using Quantum Physics in the real world  by Professor Erling Riis, Professor of Physics, Chair of Photonics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow.

1110    Lecture The Radiobiology of Radiotherapy by Dr Charles Deehan, Honorary Senior Lecturer, King’s College London and former Head of Radiotherapy Physics at Guy’s & St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust London.

1200    Visit to the Hunterian Museum

1230    Four Course Lunch with Wine (Waitress Service) with partners and friends

1500    Finish

Abstracts 

Quantum Technology - using Quantum Physics in the real world by Professor Erling Riis, MSc, PhD, Professor of Physics, Chair of Photonics, University of Strathclyde, 107 Rottenrow, Glasgow. 

Quantum mechanics is one of the most successful physics theories of the 20th century. It explains the microscopic world around us and has both enabled a profound understanding of Nature and allowed us to exploit in new ways. It is the understanding behind the microscopic quantum world that has given us the semiconductor technology, that is at the core of the vast majority of electronic components and devices, and the laser, that is a back-bone component in data storage and transmission and increasingly in advanced manufacturing.

However, these applications do not directly make use of the really weird effects in quantum mechanics such as superposition (different states at the same time) and entanglement (action at a distance). They now form the basis for a range of new quantum technologies (Quantum 2.0) ranging from secure communications systems and computers with unprecedented power to new types of sensors and atomic clocks, that would be out by less than a second in the age of the Universe. The emphasis in this talk will be on clocks and other precision measurements based on light interacting with atoms from above room temperature all the way to less than a millionth of a degree above absolute zero.

The Radiobiology of Radiotherapy by Dr Charles Deehan, BSc. (Hons), MSc. PhD., Honorary Senior Lecturer, King’s College London and former Head of Radiotherapy Physics at Guy’s & St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust London.

In the last three decades we have seen many improvements in radiotherapy treatment. These have come not only from developments in accurate calculation and delivery of radiation dose but also by exploiting radiobiological initiatives and advantages.

Radiobiology is the study of how tumour and normal cells and tissues respond when exposed to ionising radiation. From these studies novel treatment regimens are emerging which present exciting opportunities to benefit patient care. At the centre of this work is the understanding of how different tissues behave when treatment schedules are altered.

The basis of radiobiology and its relevance to radiotherapy treatments will be presented in this talk. A description of the underlying effects of radiation on tissue will be given and how the effects of irradiation can be modelled in order to predict the outcome when clinical schedules are changed. Following a brief historical background the focus will be on the use of the Linear Quadratic (LQ) model which is the most widely used in the clinic. Specific examples will be presented showing how the LQ model is used to answer questions that arise in the course of everyday treatments. 

Menu

Roasted pepper and vine tomato soup with basil crème fraîche

Fillet of salmon with baked fennel, dauphinoise potatoes, seasonal greens and a tarragon jus

A selection of British cheese with oatcakes

Raspberry and white chocolate crème brûlée, with shortbread thin  

Coffee and University dark chocolate mints

Fruit Juice and Sparkling Mineral Water

In addition, the following wines are also included:

1. White Wine : University of Glasgow Chenin Blanc, South Africa

2.  Red Wine :  Melodius Malbec, Argentina

BOOKING FORM

Please complete either Section A or B, as appropriate, as well as Section C.

SECTION A

I am a Member and wish to attend at a cost of £41.00.

I will/will not be accompanied by my Partner (Cost £41.00), making a total of .............person(s).

………………………………………………………………………………………………

SECTION B

I am not a Member and wish to attend at a cost of £51.00.

I will/will not be accompanied by my Partner (Cost £51.00), making a total of ………..person(s).

………………………………………………………………………………………………

SECTION C              Name: ……………………………………………….

                                    Address: ……………………………………………

                                               ……………………………………………..

                                    E-mail: -----------------------------------------------------

Name of Partner (if coming) ………………………………

I enclose a cheque for £………….

Special dietary requirements…………………………………………………………….

The completed form, together with payment, should be forwarded to

Mrs Gail Millar, 4 Wellview Lane, Muirieston, West Livingston, EH54 9HU, to arrive by Tuesday the 15th of January 2019.   Cheques should be made payable to the Institute of Physics.  Please note the new address for the Seniors Group Coordinator.

Organised by: 2. IOPS Seniors’ Group

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Location icon
4. Melville Room, Gilbert Scott Building (Main Building), University of Glasgow, University Avenue, Glasgow, UK, G12 8QQ
Clock icon
10:00 – 15:00 22 Jan 2019

Invite friends
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