This service is in BETA
Visit old events site
Event image
Astronomy by Microscope

Clock icon
19:30 – 19:30 13 Dec 2011
Location icon
Berrill Lecture Theatre, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA

Speakers: Professor Monica Grady, Faculty of Science, The Open University

Astronomers traditionally study stars and planets using telescopes. But we can also learn about them by using microscopes – through studying meteorites. From meteorites, we can learn about the processes and materials that shaped the Solar System and our planet. Tiny grains in meteorites have come from earlier exploding stars, the stuff from which the Sun was born. This can be studied in the lab.
Meteorites are ancient natural objects that survive their fall to Earth from space. They are the oldest things that we have for study. Some are metallic but most are stony. Almost all are fragments from asteroids and were formed at the birth of the Solar System about 4570 million years ago. They vary widely in composition, spanning a whole range of planetary materials: some are completely unmelted stony `chondrites' while others are different forms of iron. Meteorites carry records of all stages of Solar System history. For example, meteorites from the Moon and Mars help us understand how those bodies formed and evolved.
In her lecture, Monica will describe how the microscope is another tool that can be employed to trace stellar and planetary processes.
Free car park near the lecture theatre

Event type: Lecture/Talk
Organised by: London and South East Branch
Contact details: Email: r.mackintosh@open.ac.uk or t.a.bartlett@open.ac.uk (secretary)

Invite friends
Link copied!
Location icon
Berrill Lecture Theatre, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA
Clock icon
19:30 – 19:30 13 Dec 2011
Tag icon

Invite friends
Link copied!
No registration required unless stated otherwise