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Electromagnetic fields and the human body – friend or foe?

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19:30 – 19:30 19 Mar 2013
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The St John’s Suite at the White Hart, Salisbury, SP1 2SD

Speakers: Prof. Tony Barker

Prof. Tony Barker, Dept. of Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield

We are all exposed, on a daily basis, to electromagnetic fields from a variety of sources. Some of these exposures are intentional; others are an indirect consequence of a range of technologies.
One intentional exposure uses large pulses of magnetic field to stimulate nerves and the human brain, by inducing currents in the body. In the twenty-five years since its first practical demonstration transcranial magnetic nerve stimulation (TMS) has become widely used in neurophysiology, psychology and psychiatry as well as other disciplines. This talk will give a brief overview of the technique, including a live demonstration of this very real effect of an electromagnetic field.

More controversial is our inadvertent exposure to fields from sources such as mobile phones and overhead power cables. There is some public concern, and much scientific debate, over the possible health risks from such fields. As an introduction to this controversial area the sources and magnitudes of these fields will be discussed, along with some of the key findings from the literature and their implications for human health.
Refreshments from 7pm. Attendance is free, there is no need to reserve places in advance, and non-IOP members are welcome.

Event type: Lecture/Talk
Sponsored by: Dept. of Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield
Organised by: South West Branch
Contact details: Philip Milsom : salisburyiop@salisburyiop.org.uk

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Location icon
The St John’s Suite at the White Hart, Salisbury, SP1 2SD
Clock icon
19:30 – 19:30 19 Mar 2013
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