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Faster than light galaxies

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19:30 – 21:30 8 Dec 2009
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Berrill Lecture Theatre at the Open University
Walton Hall
Milton Keynes
MK7 6AA

Speakers: Bob Lambourne, piCETL, Open University

The expansion of the universe was discovered in the 1920s, and the accelerating rate of that expansion in 1998. Since then new observations have enabled astrophysicists to determine key cosmological parameters, such as the age of the universe, with a degree of precision that would once have been hard to imagine. This talk explores the implications of the current 'best fit' values of those cosmological parameters, concentrating in particular on the behaviour of distant galaxies, many of which were heading away from us at speeds in excess of the speed of light when they emitted the light by which we see them!
How far away was the most distant galaxy when it emitted the light we use to observe it? How far away is it now? What is its current speed? Are there likely to be galaxies we will never see? And how can we see a galaxy at all if it is moving away faster than its light can travel? For the answer to these and other cosmic conundrums be sure to observe 'Faster than light galaxies'.

Event type: Lecture/Talk
Organised by: London and South East Branch
Contact details: Prof. Raymond Mackintosh (tel 01908 652 489 or 07740 867 634; e-mail r.mackintosh@open.ac.uk) or Tracy Bartlett (tel 01908 652 514; e-mail t.a.bartlett@open.ac.uk). Please book with one of the above.

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Berrill Lecture Theatre at the Open University
Walton Hall
Milton Keynes
MK7 6AA
Clock icon
19:30 – 21:30 8 Dec 2009
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