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Galactic Center Gamma-rays: Pulsars versus Dark Matter
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16:00 – 17:00 15 Feb 2018
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Room SCN 128, Science Centre North, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Ireland

Prof. David Smith
Centre d’Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan (CENBG), France

 

NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is in its tenth year on orbit. The LAT (Large Area Telescope), its primary instrument, continues to accumulate more and more detail on the GeV sky. The glow around the centre of the Milky Way turns out to be about 10% brighter than what our knowledge of cosmic rays incident on interstellar gas & dust predicts, and the excess has a distinct spectral signature consistent with different explanations, among which are:

1) it could be the sum of many unresolved pulsars

2) it could come from the
annihilation of particle dark matter.

I will present the various pieces of this interesting puzzle, which draw upon many recent results from the Fermi satellite.

David A. Smith is the Fermi group co-leader at the Centre d’Etudes Nucleaires (Center of Nuclear Studies) de Bordeaux-Gradignan (CENBG), France. He's the spokesman for Fermi for the French National Institute for Particle Physics and Nuclear Physics (IN2P3) of the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), and is the co-lead of the "Galactic Sources" Science Working Group within the LAT collaboration. His primary research interest is the study of pulsars through gamma rays.

Smith grew up in Berkeley, California, except for spending 1960 in Geneva, Switzerland and 1971 in Strasbourg, France. He has a B.A. in Physics from the University of California at Berkeley. He received his PhD degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1988 for work on the CDF experiment at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider that lead to the discovery of the Top quark. He was then a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) in Pisa, Italy for six years. David Smith began work in gamma-ray astrophysics in 1991, developing innovative telescopes to exploit atmospheric Cherenkov light. He worked on experiments on the island of La Palma in the Canaries, and at a reconverted solar facility in the French Pyrenees. He has been a permanent IN2P3 staff member in Bordeaux since 1995.

 

More details from John Quinn john.quinn@ucd.ie

Organised by: IOP Ireland and School of Physics, UCD

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Location icon
Room SCN 128, Science Centre North, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Ireland
Clock icon
16:00 – 17:00 15 Feb 2018

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