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Historical supernova explosions in our galaxy and their remnants

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19:00 – 21:00 3 Nov 2009
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Berrill Lecture Theatre at the Open University
Walton Hall
Milton Keynes
MK7 6AA

Speakers: Dr D A Green, Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge

Some stars end their lives with a spectacularly violent explosion: a supernova. Supernovae release huge amounts of material and energy into the interstellar medium, producing supernova remnants which are observable for up to around a hundred thousand years. In our galaxy we expect about one supernova every 50 years or so. However, we only see the light from relatively nearby ones, since interstellar dust obscures the more distant ones. There are historical records of about half a dozen supernovae in our galaxy over the last two thousand years. Most of these records are from China, Japan or Korea, although there are European records of the more recent ones, and a variety of Arabic records are also available for some events. The speaker will review these records of the historical supernovae, and the modern observations of the supernovae remnants that they have produced.

Event type: Lecture/Talk
Organised by: London and South East Branch
Contact details: Prof. Raymond Mackintosh (tel 01908 652 489 or 07740 867 634; e-mail r.mackintosh@open.ac.uk) or Tracy Bartlett (tel 01908 652 514; e-mail t.a.bartlett@open.ac.uk). Please book with one of the above.

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Berrill Lecture Theatre at the Open University
Walton Hall
Milton Keynes
MK7 6AA
Clock icon
19:00 – 21:00 3 Nov 2009
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