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POST QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY - Public Lecture at Wrexham Glyndwr University

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18:30 – 20:00 6 Dec 2018
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This lecture answers the question, "Can Quantum Computers make today's encryption methods obsolete?"

The speaker, Jonathan Blackledge is Stokes Professor of the Science Foundation Ireland, and a Visiting Professor at Wrexham Glyndwr University.

The lecture will be given in English.

Abstract:

The cryptographic strength of an encryption algorithm usually reflects on how difficult it is to break a cipher and has traditionally been evaluated in terms of measures that are related to the conventional computing power available at the time the algorithm was designed. It has been known for some time that the majority of popular public-key encryption algorithms could be efficiently broken by a sufficiently powerful quantum computer. However, until recently, quantum computing was a hypothetical concept and so the idea of breaking legacy encryption algorithms using quantum computers was only of theoretical interest. Basic quantum computers now exist in many research laboratories across the world, companies such as Microsoft, IBM and Google all have their own research programs, whilst organisations such as the US, EU and Chinese governments are all investing in it. For this reason, post-quantum cryptography, which is concerned with the development of encryption algorithms that are considered secure even against an attack by a quantum computer, has finally come of age [1]. Thus, new projects such as the Open Quantum Safe project, initiated in late 2016, have been established with the goal of developing quantum-resistant cryptography. This includes the development of an open source library of post-quantum schemes and C functions for quantum-resistant encryption algorithms with an initial focus on key exchange algorithms.

After a brief overview of the principal issues associated with the encryption of information, this lecture investigates some new approaches to encrypting and hiding information that can be proved to be resistant to an attack by a quantum computer. A governing condition in regard to such resistance is based on adopting the cryptographic law: ‘one message, one algorithm, one key’, which is the principle associated with the design of a ‘one-time pad’. In this context, the lecture presents some new encryption and encrypted information hiding methods including some recent work on digital phase-only encryption [2] and super-encryption [3] using personalised algorithms obtained through the application of Evolutionary Computing [4], for example. Finally, the lecture considers the transmission of information through a channel characterised by additive noise and the detection of signals with very low Signal-to-Noise Ratio’s. By studying the chirp transform, it is shown how a coding technique called ‘chip modulation’ provides a uniquely optimal solution to the problem of transmitting binary streams (encrypted or otherwise) through noisy communication channels [5].

[1] D J Bernstein, J Buchmann and E Dahmen, Post-Quantum Cryptography, Springer, 2009.
[2] J M Blacklege, P Tobin, J Myeza and C M Adolfo, Information Hiding with Data Diffusion using Convolutional Encoding for Super-encryption, International Journal for Pure and Applied Mathematics, Vol. 7, No. 4, 319-356, 2017.

[3] J M Blackledge, W Govere and S Sibanda, Phase-Only Digital Encryption, International Journal for Pure and Applied Mathematics, 2018 (to be published).

[4] J M Blackledge, S Bezobrazov, P Tobin and F Zamora, Cryptography using Evolutionary Computing, Proc. ISSC2013, Letterkenny, Co Donegal, Ireland, June 20-21, 2013.

[5] J M Blackledge, W Govere and S Sibanda, On the Properties of Phase-only Functions and the Optimal Communication of Information, International Journal for Pure and Applied Mathematics, 2018 (submitted).

Organised by: IOP Wales

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Location icon
Clock icon
18:30 – 20:00 6 Dec 2018

Invite friends
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